Posts tagged: exits

Hedda Sterne (August 4, 1910 – April 8, 2011)

By , April 12, 2011

“Hedda Sterne, an artist whose association with the Abstract Expressionists became fixed forever when she appeared prominently in a now-famous 1951 Life magazine photograph of the movement’s leading lights, died on Friday at her home in Manhattan. She was 100.”

Pictured from left rear: Willem De Kooning, Adolph Gottlieb, Ad Reinhardt, Hedda Sterne; next row: Richard Pousette-Dart, William Baziotes, Jimmy Ernst, Jackson Pollock, James Brooks, Clyfford Still, Robert Motherwell, Bradley Walker Tomlin; foreground: Theodoros Stamos, Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko. Missing from photo: Weldon Kees, Fritz Bultman and Hans Hofmann. Photographed by Nina Leen for Time/Life, 1951.

George Tooker: 1920-2011

By , March 30, 2011

George Tooker, Government Bureau (1956)

“George Tooker, a painter whose haunting images of trapped clerical workers and forbidding government offices expressed a peculiarly 20th-century brand of anxiety and alienation, died on Sunday at his home in Hartland, Vt. He was 90.”

Sigmar Polke (1941-2010)

By , June 14, 2010

“Sigmar Polke, an artist of infinite, often ravishing pictorial jest, whose sarcastic and vibrant layering of found images and maverick, chaos-provoking painting processes left an indelible mark on the last four decades of contemporary painting, died (June 10) in Cologne, Germany.”

Tobias Wong (1974-2010)

By , June 2, 2010

“Tobias Wong, a designer whose outrageous sendups of luxury goods and witty expropriation of work by other designers blurred the line between conceptual art and design, died on Sunday at his home in Manhattan. He was 35.  The office of the chief medical examiner in Manhattan ruled the death a suicide.”

Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010)

By , May 31, 2010

“Louise Bourgeois, the French-born American artist who gained fame only late in a long career, when her psychologically charged abstract sculptures, drawings and prints had a galvanizing effect on the work of younger artists, particularly women, died on Monday in Manhattan, where she lived. She was 98.”

Nancy Spero (1926–2009)

By , October 21, 2009

“Nancy Spero, an American artist and feminist whose tough, exquisite figurative art addressed the realities of political violence, died on Sunday in Manhattan, reports Holland Cotter for the New York Times. She was eighty-three.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/20/arts/design/20spero.html

Charles Seliger (1926-2009)

By , October 9, 2009

Charles Seliger, a distinguished abstract expressionist painter who played a vital role in the New York art scene for over sixty-five years, died on Thursday. He was 83 years old.”

UPDATED October 26, 2009
Don Quixote (1944) is now on view in the lobby of the Whitney.

Grace Hartigan (Mar 28, 1922 — Nov 15, 2008)

By , November 18, 2008

GraceHartigan_500

Grace Hartigan, a second-generation Abstract Expressionist whose gestural, intensely colored paintings often incorporated images drawn from popular culture, leading some critics to see in them prefigurings of Pop Art, died on Saturday in Baltimore. She was 86.

Robert Rauschenberg (1925 – 2008)

By , May 13, 2008

Tracer

Even those of us who revere the work of Robert Rauschenberg have to admit that his mad esthetic output, while jovial and fearless, borders on being suicidal and squandering and can lead to art that peters out, turns theatrical or becomes formulaic . . . Rauschenberg is so convinced that all things in the world are equal that the work itself often equals out and gets slushy in the mind. He is a sort of artistic suicide bomber: a true believer who is unafraid to have his work look cruddy.” – Jerry Saltz

= = = Added Jan 11, 2010 = = =

“Every gay man comes out eventually – even if it only happens when he dies. Writing an obituary may be the first chance to tell the truth about a gay man’s life, but sadly this is not always the case. Even people who were out and proud can find themselves pushed back in the closet following their death. Lovers are often airbrushed out of the picture, in a way that would never happen with someone’s husband or wife.” – Richard Smith